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Black Sapote FAQs

Black sapote fruits ripen from skins of bright green with yellow fruit, into a mature and rich, dark green peel and deep, chocolate colored fruit. About the size and shape of a squat tomato, ripe avocados have a thin, inedible, olive green peel. The fruit inside starts out hard, astringent and inedible, but with time, matures into a fruit that is sweet and scoopable with a cocoa and caramel flavor. Typically seedless, black sapote fruits can sometimes have up to a dozen hard, inedible seeds inside that should be discarded before eating.

Black sapote is a versatile fruit that’s used in foods and beverages alike. The chocolate pudding fruit, black sapote, is used raw in puddings, shakes and snacks. Black sapote is fermented into a brandy-like liqueur, and can be used as a rich, sweet ingredient in cocktails. This special fruit is used in recipes for sweets, pastries, snacks, drinks and flavorful sauces.

The black sapote fruit is a special type of persimmon that’s also known as the “chocolate pudding fruit”. A nickname like that is a lot to live up to, and the black sapote delivers on that visual beautifully. The flavor of ripe black sapote fruit is a complex mix of sweet caramel, cocoa and persimmon with a scoopable, papaya-like flesh. Another name for this hard-to-find fruit is soapapple, which may harken to the soapy, astringent flavor of the unripened fruit (which is inedible).

The black sapote is native to both coastal regions of Mexico, and throughout parts of Central America. In the United States, black sapote fruit grows in Hawaii, Florida and Puerto Rico. Black sapote is also cultivated in Cuba, the Dominican Republic and the Philippines. Three trees from which the black sapote fruit grows are evergreens that can be over 80 feet high! Their leaves are long, dark and glossy with a pointy, oblong shape.

When you buy black sapote fruit, it may still be unripened. Black sapote changes color inside and outside as it ripens, so it helps you know when the fruit inside is sweet, ripe and edible. Very ripe black sapote is so soft that, like avocados, they’re often bought just shy of ripe.

On the outside, unripened black sapote skin is bright green with blushes of yellow. This peel darkens to a dark olive green when ripe. Inside, unripened fruit is similar to an unripened avocado in color and texture. Unripened black sapote fruit matures from a hard, greenish-yellow color into a very dark brown that is soft and creamy.

Black sapote fruit makes it easy for you to know when it’s ripe and ready! You’ll know your fruits are ripe when the black sapote’s skin is a dark, olive green, and easily yields with gentle pressure from your thumb. About the size of a medium tomato, the ripe black sapote will feel heavy in your hand for its size. Inside, the black sapote flesh will have a very soft and almost scoopable texture with a rich, chocolate brown color.

Preparing black sapote is easy and fun! The hardest part is waiting for them to ripen to their most delicious, cocoa-caramel pudding potential. Once your black sapote fruits are ripe, the inedible skin and seeds should be removed. Black sapote can be used in raw food and drink preparations, as well as cooked desserts, snacks and savory dishes.

Often seedless, some black sapote fruits can have up to a dozen flat, dark, shiny seeds within. Their seeds are inedible and should be discarded.

The black sapote is native to both coastal regions of Mexico, and throughout parts of Central America. In the United States, black sapote fruit grows in Hawaii, Florida and Puerto Rico. Black sapote is also cultivated in Cuba, the Dominican Republic and the Philippines.

Three trees from which the black sapote fruit grows are evergreens that can be over 80 feet high! Their leaves are long, dark and glossy with a pointy, oblong shape.

High in potassium, calcium and vitamin C, black sapote fruit offers a healthy dose of nutrition while tasting like chocolate pudding. If that’s not enough for you, here’s more information about the nutritional content of black sapote.

Black Sapote Nutrition (1 medium fruit, 130g). 

  • Calories: 174
  • Protein: 3g
  • Fat: 1g
  • Carbohydrates: 44g
  • Fiber: 3g
  • Sodium: 13mg
  • Potassium: 447 mg
  • Calcium: 51mg
  • Vitamin C: 26mg

The best time to buy black sapote fruit is when it’s in season. In the United States, Floridian black sapotes are available in the winter, from December through February, with a second fruiting season in the summer from June through August. In Mexico, black sapote fruits are available late in the year, from August through January.

Black sapote is a versatile fruit that’s used in foods and beverages alike. The chocolate pudding fruit, black sapote, is used raw in puddings, shakes and snacks. Black sapote is fermented into a brandy-like liqueur, and can be used as a rich, sweet ingredient in cocktails. This special fruit is used in recipes for sweets, pastries, snacks, drinks and flavorful sauces.

A nickname like “chocolate pudding fruit” is a lot to live up to, and the black sapote delivers on that visual beautifully. The flavor of ripe black sapote fruit, on the other hand, is much more complex. The custardy, chocolate-brown fruit of black sapote tastes of sweet caramel, cocoa and persimmon with a scoopable, papaya-like flesh.

Inedible when unripened, fully mature black sapote fruit can be enjoyed raw or cooked in a variety of dishes. Black sapote is a creamy, caramel-chocolate flavored fruit that adds pudding-like texture to recipes for snacks, desserts, sauces and pastries. Ripe black sapote fruit shines in sweet dishes, but can be incorporated into savory dishes where its rich, sweet fruit can bring flavorful balance.

Ripe fruit of black sapote fruit makes drinks sweet, creamy and richly flavored with its cocoa and caramel essence. It can be used in dessert-like cocktails, sweet and spicy beverages, smoothies and juices.

To make delicious alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, use your black sapotes to make a basic syrup, then add it to your drinks.

Black sapote fruits should be stored at room temperature until they ripen, as refrigeration can slow the ripening process and affect the flavor of the fruit. You’ll know your fruits are ripe when their skin is dark, olive green, and easily yields with gentle pressure from your thumb. The flesh inside will have a very soft and almost scoopable texture with a rich, chocolate brown color. Once fully ripened, black sapotes will stay fresh for up to another three days in the refrigerator.

Your FruitStand fam always encourages you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your dog. There is very little information about whether this fruit is suitable for dogs to eat, so it’s best to keep black sapote fruit away from your pooch.

The rich brown color and pudding-like texture of ripe black sapote fruit has the potential to stain clothing and fabrics. To prevent a stain from setting in, treat the mark with a laundry or upholstery cleaner that’s safe for that particular fabric as soon as you can.

The rich brown color and pudding-like texture of ripe black sapote fruit has the potential to stain clothing and fabrics. If some black sapote schmutz falls on your shirt or tablecloth, treat the mark with a laundry or upholstery cleaner that’s safe for that particular fabric.

The black sapote and chocolate persimmon are commonly confused, but they’re actually two different species. Both of these fruits are considered different types of persimmons, and the latin name for black sapote is Diospyros nigraI. Each of these fruits is inedible until ripe when their flesh is soft and sweet with a rich, chocolatey brown color.

Black sapotes have olive green, even yellowish, skin when ripe. Asian chocolate persimmons, on the other hand, are bright orange. Their shapes differ as well, with black sapote taking on the squat tomato shape that’s similar to a fuyu persimmon while the chocolate persimmon has a more elongated, pepper-like shape.

If black sapote spoils, you may smell something a little funky. To refresh, compost or discard any old black sapote fruit. Then clean the area where your fruit was stored with hot, soapy water or kitchen cleaning spray.

To prevent unpleasant aromas from produce that goes past its prime, keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda where you store fresh foods. Replace the box every two to three months.

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy black sapote, we’ve got some great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality black sapote fruits. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping black sapote harvests, join our email newsletter!

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