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Buddha's Hand FAQs

Just look at that fruit! Buddha’s hand is a citron fruit that’s as delicious as it is beautiful. Here at FruitStand, we live for fruit experiences, and this is one we don’t want you to miss!

Buddha’s hand is covered in a bright yellow citrus peel. This fragrant outer zest contains essential oils with the most potent flavor. Inside, the white pith is firm and seedless with a crunchy texture and a mildly sweet, citrusy flavor.

Also known as the finger citron, Buddha’s hand is named for its unique shape that resembles the way fingers and hands look in a prayer position. A member of the citrus family, buddha’s hand has a one-of-a-kind flavor and a famously intoxicating fragrance to match. One sniff gives you a sense of what buddha’s hand tastes like: a heady blend of citrus flower blossoms, bittersweet grapefruit, lemony citron and sweet yuzu.

They may not be juicy, but that doesn’t stop buddha’s hand citron from being incredibly delicious and useful in the kitchen. Zest or shave it into salads, cook it into candies and jams, and infuse almost any beverage with it’s aromatic, lemony flavor. Some of the most common preparations of buddha’s hand are raw uses like zesting, concentrated into a sweet marmalade-like tea, and cooked with sugar for sour candies. Use it in just about any recipe that calls for citrus zest for a new take on classic favorites. 

Buddha’s hand is believed to be native to India and China, where it continues to be cultivated today. Luckily, today buddha’s hand also grows in temperate areas of the United States as well! These beautiful citrons grow on a thorny bush that reaches about six feet high at maturity. Like many citrus, buddha’s hand citron fruits come into season in the fall and last through the winter, typically from late October through January. The peak season for buddha’s hand happens around mid-November.

The buddha’s hand fruit is a bright, cheery yellow that’s very close to the color of a lemon when it’s fully ripe. In its immature state, buddha’s hand fruits begin with a dark green, waxy skin. Inside, the dense pith is white and dewy.

It’s easy to tell when a buddha’s hand fruit is ripe. Buddha’s hand fruits start out with dark green skin, and the fingers are “closed” giving the fruit a pear-like shape. As the fruit ripens, the dark green skin turns bright yellow and the “fingers” of the fruit begin to open. The buddha’s hand is fully ripe when it’s completely yellow.

No juice? No problem! Buddha’s hand may not be juicy, but that doesn’t stop them from being incredibly delicious and versatile in the kitchen. Zest or shave buddha’s hand into salads, cook it into candies and jams, and infuse almost any beverage with its aromatic, lemony flavor. Some of the most common preparations of buddha’s hand are raw uses like zesting, concentrated into a sweet marmalade-like tea, and cooked with sugar for sour candies.

The buddha’s hand is blissfully seedless! When you cut a buddha’s hand fruit in half, you’ll see a firm, solid pith inside, with no seeds or center to cut around.

Buddha’s hand is believed to be native to India and China, where it continues to be cultivated today. Luckily, today buddha’s hand also grows in temperate areas of the United States as well! These beautiful citrons grow on a thorny bush that reaches about six feet high at maturity.

Perhaps because of its rarity, there isn’t a lot of reliable nutritional information about buddha’s hand fruit. Check with your doc if you have concerns about whether buddha’s hand is safe for you to eat. Otherwise, this citron has 100% of FruitStand’s recommended daily intake of deliciousness!

Like many citrus, buddha’s hand citron fruits come into season in the fall and last through the winter, typically from late October through January. The peak season for buddha’s hand happens around mid-November.

Buddha’s hand is an unusual fruit that can be used in everyday recipes and drinks! Use it in just about any recipe that calls for citrus zest for a new take on old favorites. Buddha’s hand can be used raw in salads, snacks and drinks. When cooked, buddha’s hand fruit becomes soft and sweet, and is typically cooked with added sugar for sweet treats. Impart complex acidic flavor that’s sour, sweet and fragrant through marinades and infusions using this hard to find fruit.

A member of the citron family, buddha’s hand fruit has a very unique citrus flavor. Buddha’s hand aroma is famously intoxicating too, and one sniff gives you a good idea of what it tastes like: a heady blend of citrus flower blossoms, bittersweet grapefruit, lemony citron and sweet yuzu. The thin, outer layer of the fruit is called the zest and contains essential oils with most potent buddha’s hand flavor. Inside, the firm, white, pithy flesh has a crunchy texture and mildly sweet citrus flavor.

When you see a buddha’s hand citron fruit for the first time you may wonder, how in the world do you eat this beautiful thing? It’s easy to prepare buddha’s hand, raw or cooked, for dishes where you want an unusual and invigorating citrus taste. Similar in flavor to a citron crossed with lemon and yuzu, both the thin peel and dense pith of the buddha’s hand are edible. They’re seedless, which makes for much easier slicing!

Buddha’s hand can be eaten raw, and is often used for it’s flavorful zest. The peel contains concentrated essential oils and is the most potently flavored portion of the fruit. Inside, the dense pith is firm, crunchy and has a delightful flavor. Unlike other citrus fruits, buddha’s hand’s pith is sweet and crunchy, not tough and bitter. Use raw buddha’s hand in salads, marinades, ceviche and snacks. 

Often cooked down with sugar, buddha’s hand is famously enjoyed in sweet dishes, particularly in candy making, jams, creams and cookies.

Zested, syruped or infused, buddha’s hand brightens up beverages! Buddha’s hand can be used fresh or cooked to flavor cocktails, juices, even hot water. The zest and sweet, edible pith adds out of this world, citrusy flavor to drinks of all kinds. Some of the most popular ways to drink buddha’s hand are infused into spirits, concentrated into a tea that resembles marmelade, cooked into a rich syrup or steeped in hot water.

Buddha’s hand is a hearty fruit that can withstand time on the countertop (and you’ll love the fragrance!). Store your buddha’s hand citron fruits on the countertop for up to two weeks. In the refrigerator, buddha’s hand will stay fresh for up to four weeks. For even longer freshness, freeze whole or cut fruit, and buddha’s hand zest for up to three months.

In short: no, do not feed buddha’s hand to your dog. As always, your FruitStand fam encourages you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch. There isn’t a lot of information about whether dogs can eat certain weird and hard-to-find fruits like this one, and some citrus fruits can be toxic to dogs. We think this is a fruit best enjoyed by the humans in your family.

Buddha’s hand is not a particularly juicy fruit, but it’s bright yellow skin and light colored pith can leave a mark on fabrics. Depending on the fabric, if treated immediately, buddha’s hand marks can be treated to prevent a stain.

Buddha’s hand is not a particularly juicy fruit but it’s bright yellow skin and light colored pith can leave a mark on fabrics. If you drop a bit of buddha's hand on your clothing, table cloth or napkins, first treat the spot with a stain remover that’s safe for that particular fabric. Follow the directions on the product to prevent the spot from setting, and pop the item into the washer as soon as you can.

Both the buddha’s hand and lemon are considered citrus fruits, and boast bright, sweetly acidic flavor. Each fruit has a waxy yellow skin that, like other citrus fruits, contains flavorful essential oils. In fact, a buddha's hand can even look like a squiggly lemon!

Despite their similarities, it’s where they differ that’s the most interesting. Buddha’s hand flavor is unmistakably citrusy, with a complex flavor that’s bitter, sweet, floral and bright. This fruit has a bitterness similar to a grapefruit and less sourness than a lemon, with a light sweetness that balances out buddha’s hand’s exceptionally unique flavor. We know and love lemons for their juicy flesh that’s divided into individual, pulpy sections. Perhaps most notably, Buddha’s hand has no juicy fruit inside. Unlike other citrus fruits, its inner pith is, crunchy, sweet, citrusy - and completely edible!

It’s hard to believe that something that smells so delightful when fresh might turn so funky if spoiled. If your buddha’s hand citron fruit begins to spoil, immediately discard it into the compost. Then, clean the area with warm, soapy water to remove any residual odors.

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy buddha's hand, we’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality buddha's hand. To be the first to know when FruitStand has buddha's hand harvests ready to ship directly to you, join our email newsletter!

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