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Calamondin FAQs

Nick Musica
Published Mar 02, 2021. Read time: 1 minute

Calamondin has a sour and tangy citrus flavor that tastes a lot like lemon, with more tangerine sweetness. They’re eaten most often in their half ripe stage, where the skin is still yellow and the flavor is much more bold and sour. As it ripens and turns orange, calamondin flavor matures into a mellow, subtle citrus juice. At this stage, it’s usually used in recipes where sugar is added to boost sweetness.

These tiny fruits can be eaten whole as a solo snack, but they bring so much flavor to all kinds of food parties. As a lemony sweet and sour citrus, calamondin juice is excellent when paired with fish, poultry and even pork. It brings flavorful acidity to recipes for drinks as well as candies, desserts and sauces. Just about anywhere you like to use lemons or limes, calamondin is welcome!

Tangy calamondin are teeny citrus that have a lot of nicknames. Botanically known as Citrus × microcarpa, they’re commonly referred to as calamansi, Philippine lime or lemon, calamondin orange, calamandarin, golden lime, Panama orange, musk orange, bitter-sweets and acid oranges. They’re completely edible (except for the seeds) and are only about the size of a quarter!

Small and round, calamondin are citrus fruits about an inch or so across and weigh just a few ounces each. At the best stage of ripeness, their edible skin is thin and yellow. It may even have blushes of green or orange. Over time, calamondin ripen to a cheery orange color, reminiscent of its kumquat and mandarin orange parents. Inside, the citrus fruit is yellow to orange depending on its ripeness. The seeds are white, pointed and inedible.

Calamondin grows natively in the Philippines and China. They grow from trees that can be up to 20 feet tall and have shiny, pointed leaves. Today they’re cultivated throughout Asia, in some parts of South America and in the United States. Calamondin also can be harvested year round and aren’t known for a particular peak season The trees produce fruit in waves throughout the year when the calamondin are yellow and firm to the touch.

Calamondin are small, round citrus fruits, about an inch or so across. At the best stage of ripeness, their edible skin is thin and yellow. It may even have blushes of green or orange. Over time, calamondin ripen to a cheery orange color, reminiscent of its kumquat and mandarin orange parents. Inside, the citrus fruit is yellow to orange depending on its ripeness. The seeds are white, pointed and inedible.

Calamondin are ready to eat at the time of harvesting. Like bananas, it’s helpful to understand how calamondin’s color changes as it ripens. You see, these tangy little citruses are carefully hand plucked from trees when they’re still yellow with blushes of green. At this stage, they’re about halfway ripe and have their brightest, most sour and tangy flavor. Once they turn orange, the flavor mellows to be less tart and tangy and more subtle.

It couldn’t be easier to prepare calamondin for your next drink, snack or meal. If you have experience preparing a lemon or lime, you’re gonna be great at eating calamondin! These small citrus fruits can be eaten whole, skin and all, in their raw, fresh state. They’re most often used when they’re halfway ripe for the boldest flavor. Once they ripen to a golden orange, the flavor is much more mellow and subtle. Calamondin can be cooked into rich soups and stews, desserts and candies as well.

No. Similar to other citrus varieties, calamondin seeds are not edible.

Calamondin grow natively in the Philippines and China. They grow from trees that can be up to 20 feet tall and have shiny, pointed leaves. Today they’re cultivated throughout Asia, in some parts of South America and in the United States.

Calamondin also can be harvested year round and aren’t known for a particular peak season The trees produce fruit in waves throughout the year when the calamondin are yellow and firm to the touch.

As a specialty fruit in the US, there is not a lot of reliable information readily available about the nutrition of fresh calamondin fruits. If we had to take a guess, the nutrition might be similar to other citrus fruits for its size such as kumquats, mandarin oranges and lemons. If you have questions or concerns about the nutrition of calamondin citrus fruits, consult your physician.

Calamondin can be harvested year round! The trees produce fruit in waves throughout the year when the calamondin are yellow and firm to the touch.

These tiny fruits can be eaten whole as a solo snack, but they bring so much flavor to all kinds of food parties. As a lemony sweet and sour citrus, calamondin juice is excellent when paired with fish, poultry and even pork. It brings flavorful acidity to recipes for drinks as well as candies, desserts and sauces. Just about anywhere you like to use lemons or limes, calamondin is welcome!

Calamondin is a citrus fruit with sour and tangy juice that tastes a lot like lemon, with more tangerine sweetness. They’re eaten most often in their half ripe stage, where the skin is still yellow and the flavor is much more bold and sour. As it ripens and turns orange, calamondin flavor matures into a mellow, subtle citrus juice. At this stage, it’s usually used in recipes where sugar is added to boost sweetness.

The petit calamondin is a citrus experience all its own. Their tart, sour, acidic juice tastes a lot like an orangey lemon, so a simple squeeze of a calamondin slice can brighten up anything from chips to sauces, seafood dishes and citrusy salads. In its native Philippines, it’s prized for its juice to marinate fish and other meats. It’s also well suited for jams, candies, salads, frozen treats, and desserts. If you can imagine all the ways you use lemons and limes, there are just as many ways to use a calamondin!

Use their juice or the whole fruit in drink preparations for any age! Their tangy, bright juice is welcome in beverages from plain water to teas, soda and cocktails.

Calamondin is a citrus fruit with sour and tangy juice that tastes a lot like lemon with more tangerine sweetness. As such, it’s juice makes for some very delicious beverages! Unlike some other citrus fruits, the entire thing is edible, so the whole fruit can be processed in an electric juicer if desired.

To make delicious alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, use your calamondins to make a basic syrup, then add it to your drinks. Otherwise, squeeze them into just about any drink you can think of such as water, soda, tea, cocktails and juices.

Calamondin fruit doesn’t love being stored in warm temperatures for very long once they’re harvested. As they ripen, calamondin can be left on the countertop for about five days. For the best taste and longest freshness, store calamondin in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They will last up to a month this way.

Prepare to freeze calamondin by placing whole fruits on a cookie sheet with space between each. Once frozen, store them in an airtight container in the freezer for up to six months.

Unfortunately, calamondin are known to be toxic to dogs and cats. Keep these fruits away from curious pups. These fruits are for humans only!

It’s unlikely that calamondin will leave a stain, but it’s possible. After all, these tiny fruits are known to be used as stain removers for some fabrics!

Depending on your fabric, calamondin fruit can leave a mark if it makes contact. Treat the mark with a stain remover that’s safe for the fabric and launder the item according to its cleaning instructions as soon as you can.

Are calamondin the same as kumquats? Nope! However, a calamondin is the result of a cross between a kumquat and a mandarin orange, so it share some of its unique characteristics. Calamondin are more round in shape, and are typically consumed in their half ripened state when they’re still a yellow or green color. They are still edible as their peel ripens to a brilliant orange. At that stage, the flavor is less sour.

Both citrus fruits can be eaten whole, including the skin, and are used in many of the same kinds of recipes and cooking applications. Calamondin, however, have thinner skins and a much more tangy, sour flavor than kumquats.

It’s easy to get bad smells from calamondin out of your house with a few simple steps. 

First, discard any spoiled calamondin and get it outside! Then, clean the area where calamondin fruits were stored with hot, soapy water or home cleaning spray. Let it dry thoroughly. 

Immediately refrigerate cut calamondin in an airtight container in the refrigerator. When not refrigerated, only store whole, fresh fruit in a cool, clean and well ventilated area. See our section on how to store calamondin for help on keeping them fresher for longer!

To prevent bad smells from fruit in your kitchen and home, keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda in your fridge and anywhere you store food. Refresh it every two to three months to prevent unpleasant aromas before they start.

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy calamondin, we’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality calamondin. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping calamondin harvests, join our email newsletter!

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