Save 15% on All FruitStand Experiences
  • Curated monthly experiences
  • Free shipping on member experiences
  • 15% discount on all site offers
  • Pause or skip anytime
  • Membership starts at $36 per month
July Experience
Star Fruit from Paradise Farms
Cultivate

Crenshaw Melon FAQs

Nick Musica
Published Feb 09, 2021. Read time: 1 minute

These big botanical berries add peppery sweet freshness to tons of recipes. Whether snacking on raw chunks of Crenshaw melon with lime and salt, chopping them into gazpacho or grilling thick Crenshaw slices alongside jumbo shrimp, Crenshaw melons is an everyday fruit that elevates every meal!

On the outside, crenshaw melons are mostly yellow with dashes of green throughout, eventually turning more yellow and ochre as it ripens. Inside, the Crenshaw melon has peachy yellow fruit, that’s very soft like honeydew or cantaloupe fruit. The seeds inside are light brown.

In order to tell whether a crenshaw melon is ripe (or just about any melon for that matter), you’ll use all your senses. The whole fruit will feel heavy and firm, but not too hard, and may weigh between eight and 10 pounds. Press your thumb into the end where the stem used to be, and feel that it yields to gentle pressure. When ripe, this melon’s skin is mostly yellow, and it has a signature sweet, musky fragrance. Finally, some Crenshaw melon enthusiasts insist that you give ‘em a good shake. Rattling seeds are an indication of soft, ripe melon inside! 

Storing these big melons is a dream. Crenshaw’s shelf life is known to be longer than other melons thanks to their hard, waxy rind. Fresh Crenshaw melons can be stored on the countertop until they fully ripen. They can last up to three weeks on the countertop, depending on your climate. 

Crenshaw melons are botanical berries that grow on vines. They are part of a group of melons called muskmelons that are believed to be so ancient that it’s hard to pin down their origin. It’s thought that these juicy melons are native to parts of Africa and Central Asia. Today these melons are cultivated throughout the globe. These melons peak in the summer and are available through the early winter.

Crenshaw melons (sometimes spelled Cranshaw) are believed to be one of the sweetest melons there are! A cross between a casaba melon and a cantaloupe, they have very sweet and peach colored flesh with a pleasing peppery heat.

On the outside, crenshaw melons are mostly yellow with dashes of green throughout, eventually turning more yellow and ochre as it ripens. Inside, the Crenshaw melon has peachy yellow fruit, that’s very soft like honeydew or cantaloupe fruit. The seeds inside are light brown.

Crenshaw melons may need extra time to ripen once they’re harvested. In order to tell whether a crenshaw melon is ripe (or just about any melon for that matter), you’ll use all your senses. The whole fruit will feel heavy for its size in your hands, and Crenshaw’s can weigh between 8-10 pounds! When you squeeze the melon with your hands, it should feel firm, but not like a bowling ball.

Press your thumb into the end where the stem used to be, and feel that it yields to gentle pressure. Too soft and it may have gone bad; too hard, and its not yet ripe.

Check that the skin is mostly yellow to orange, and take a good whiff of the crenshaw melon up close. Ripe Crenshaw melons have a signature sweet, musky odor when ripe. Finally, some Crenshaw melon enthusiasts insist that you give ‘em a good shake. If you can hear seeds rattling inside, you’ve got a soft, ripe melon.

Crenshaws are one heck of a culinary canvas! Beneath their hard, waxy rinds, Crenshaw’s flesh soft, succulent, juicy and very sweet. In raw preparations, Crenshaw melon is refreshing in salads, smoothies, shakes and sorbets.

Because Crenshaw melons are so high in sugar, high heat allows their natural sugars to carmelize for a surprisingly delicious fruit experience! Toss slices on the grill, cook it down into candies and syrups, or bake the delicate fruit into pastries. Experiment with this versatile fruit and share your experiences with us on Instagram @Fruitstandcom.

Crenshaw melons have a generous collection of seeds in the center just like its parents, the casaba melon and the cantaloupe. They’re elongated, brown seeds with a point at one end that are inedible when raw. It’s possible to cook the seeds thoroughly as a snack.

Crenshaw melons are botanical berries that grow on vines. They are part of a group of melons called muskmelons that are believed to be so ancient that it’s hard to pin down their origin. It’s thought that these juicy melons are native to parts of Africa and Central Asia. Today these melons are cultivated throughout the globe.

There isn’t a lot of reliable scientific information about the exact nutrition information of the Crenshaw melon, however it is believed to be similar to one of its parents, the casaba melon. Here is the nutrition information for casaba melons according to the USDA.

Crenshaw melons peak in the summer and are available through the early winter.

Fresh, incredibly sweet Crenshaw melon is used both raw and cooked, and balances dishes with its refreshing and juicy sweetness. Use them raw in creative cheese boards, salads, granola bowls or simply sprinkled with salt and a squeeze of fresh lime. High heat cooking methods like grilling and searing will caramelize the Crenshaw melons for an extra special fruit experience! Use crenshaw melons are welcome in any part of the menu.

Crenshaw melons are believed to be one of the sweetest melons there are! A cross between a casaba melon and a cantaloupe, they have very sweet and peach colored flesh with a pleasing peppery heat.

These big botanical berries add peppery sweet freshness to tons of recipes. Whether snacking on raw chunks of Crenshaw melon with lime and salt, chopping them into gazpacho or grilling thick Crenshaw slices alongside jumbo shrimp, Crenshaw melons is an everyday fruit that elevates every meal!

There are countless ways to add sweet, succulent Crenshaw melon to your drinks. Crenshaw is delicious in fresh juices, enhanced waters, cocktails, batch drinks, smoothies and liqueurs. Turn them into syrup or toss frozen chunks into your blender to sip on something a little more slushy.

Fresh Crenshaw melons can be stored on the countertop until they fully ripen. Their waxy rind allows Crenshaw melons to keep a generous shelf life. They can last up to three weeks on the countertop, depending on your climate.

Immediately refrigerate cut Crenshaw melon in an airtight container in the refrigerator, where it can keep fresh for up to three days. When not refrigerated, store whole, fresh fruit in a cool, clean and well-ventilated area.

To freeze Crenshaw melons, wait until they are fully ripened. Then, slice the Crenshaw in half, remove the inedible seeds and slice away the hard rind. Freeze sliced or cubed melon on a cookie sheet with space between each piece. Once frozen, store the fruit in an airtight container in the freezer for up to three months.

Yes! Crenshaw melon is safe for dogs to eat. Frozen chunks of Crenshaw melon may be a delicious and soothing treat for teething puppies - just make sure you’ve removed all the seeds.

Over at FruitStand, we love sharing fruit with our wet-nosed friends, so we encourage you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch. 

Crenshaw melon fruit is soft and juicy with a rosy color, so it may leave a mark if it comes into contact with some fabrics. Smock up before diving into your next peak-season Crenshaw!

If Crenshaw melon drops onto your clothing, table cloth or napkins, first treat the spot with a stain remover that’s safe for that particular fabric. Follow the directions on the product to prevent the spot from setting, and pop the item into the washer as soon as you can.

Crenshaw and casaba melons are often confused, in part because they share a lot of physical similarities. That’s because the casaba is a parent of Crenshaw! The Crenshaw melon is a cross between the casaba and Persian melons (also known as cantaloupe), and has a similar shape and size to its acorn-shaped casaba mama.

The Creshaw melon is larger than the casaba, some clocking in at 10 lbs! Their rind is similar in color and texture - smooth and yellowish green with a slight netted, waxy feel. However, the insides of these two fruits are different. Crenshaw melon has pinkish-peach colored fruit while casaba’s is yellowish white. Some say the Crenshaw is even sweeter than the casaba melon, with a more pronounced peppery heat.

It’s easy to get odors from Crenshaw melon out of your kitchen with a few simple steps. First, discard any spoiled Crenshaw melon and get it outside! Then, clean the area where it was stored with hot, soapy water or home cleaning spray. Let it dry thoroughly.

 To prevent bad smells from fruit in your kitchen and home, keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda in your fridge and anywhere you store food every two to three months to prevent unpleasant aromas before they start.

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy crenshaw melon, we’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality crenshaw melon. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping crenshaw melon harvests, join our email newsletter!

REVIEW YOUR CART ()

More Options

Personalized Gift Note
FREE

We will send this gift note by email to the recipient when their order is delivered.

Note Saved!
Save Note
TOTAL
Scroll to checkout