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Ginger FAQs

Nick Musica
Published Feb 04, 2021. Read time: 1 minute

Fresh ginger has a powerfully pungent flavor. It tastes earthy with peppery heat, and citrusy in its sharpness. When added as a spice, ginger imparts a warm, spicy flavor that has slightly acidic sweetness.

Because ginger is considered a rhizome, or a rootlike stem portion of the plant, and not a fruit, it does not need any time to ripen, and is ready to use at the moment of harvest. On the outside, ginger has a light brown and paper-thin skin covering it’s knobby shape. Inside, the flesh is a sandy yellow color. Chunks of ginger on average are about six inches long, although they can be much smaller or larger.

Loved the world over, ginger might be the most famous herbaceous spice there is! Botanically known as Zingiber officinale, and sometimes called ginger root, ginger is in fact a rhizome and not a root at all.

Ginger is believed to have originated in island regions of Southeast Asia known today as  Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and East Timor. Today, fresh ginger root is cultivated throughout the world including China, India, Hawaii and in the Middle East and Mediterranean. The ginger “root” grows from an herbaceous perennial plant that can get up to three feet tall, and is considered a false stem or rhizome. Therefore, ginger is considered a spice rather than an herb or fruit.

On the outside, ginger has a light brown and paper-thin skin covering its knobby shape. Inside, the flesh is a sandy yellow color.

Because ginger is considered a rhizome, or a rootlike stem portion of the plant, and not a fruit, it does not need any time to ripen, and is ready to use at the moment of harvest.

To prepare ginger to be used in recipes, first the papery skin should be peeled away. This can be done by scratching it away with the side of a spoon, using a vegetable peeler or paring knife. Then, it can be grated, sliced and diced to be used in many kinds of recipes.

Because ginger is considered a rhizome, or a rootlike stem portion of the plant, it does not contain seeds.

Ginger is believed to have originated in island regions of Southeast Asia known today as Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and East Timor. Today, fresh ginger root is cultivated throughout the world including China, India, Hawaii and in the Middle East and Mediterranean. The ginger “root” grows from an herbaceous perennial plant that can get up to three feet tall, and is considered a false stem or rhizome. Therefore, ginger is considered a spice rather than an herb or fruit.

Ginger is known for all kinds of health benefits. Here at FruitStand, we’re in it for the flavor! With ginger, you get an amazing produce experience and the added benefit of nutritional goodness!

Raw Ginger Nutrition (¼ cup or 24g)

  • Calories: 20
  • Carbohydrates: 4g
  • Calcium: 4mg
  • Magnesium: 10mg
  • Phosphorus: 8mg
  • Potassium: 100mg
  • Sodium: 3mg
  • Vitamin C: 1mg

Read more about the nutrition content of ginger from the USDA.

Good news for anyone who loves ginger, this potently flavorful rhizome is available year round!

Ginger is a tasty rhizome that is used as a spice for flavor rather than eating whole. It can be boiled and steeped to flavor soups, cream and sauces. Grate it into flavorful syrups, candies and marinades. The citrusy heat can also be used to flavor proteins from pork and beef to delicate sushi and seafood dishes.

Raw, candied, steeped or boiled, there are countless ways to eat ginger. Its heat is most pronounced in its raw state, and mellows a bit when cooked. It is excellent in either sweet or savory dishes, and can offer flavor and aroma at any stage of the menu.

Hot or cold, hard or soft, ginger adds distinctive flavor to beverages for people of all ages. Ginger is very popular in fresh juice drinks, teas, enhanced water beverages, smoothies and cocktails.

The key to storing ginger for as long as possible is to keep it from being exposed to lots of light and moisture. Store fresh ginger can be left on the countertop in a paper bag for up to three weeks, or seal whole, uncut ginger in an airtight container in the refrigerator to keep it fresh for even longer. This warm spice happens to freeze beautifully, and for best results, keep it sealed to best preserve the flavor. Other popular methods of storing ginger include pickling and fermenting.

Yes, ginger is safe to share with your dog in small amounts. In fact, dogs who get queasy may especially enjoy a ginger treat! Over at FruitStand, we love sharing fruit with our wet-nosed friends safely. We encourage you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch.

Fresh ginger has a faint yellow color. If it comes in contact with light colored fabrics it might leave a brownish stain.

If ginger gets on your clothing, table cloth or napkins, treat the spot with a stain remover that’s safe for that particular fabric. Follow the directions on the product to prevent the spot from setting, and pop the item into the laundry as soon as you can.

Ginger and turmeric are two immensely flavorful rhizomes (thick, rootlike components of certain plants) that are considered to be culinary spices. They are prepared and consumed in similar fashions in foods and beverages, and even originate in similar parts of the world in Asia. At first glance, they even appear somewhat similar in shape and texture.

Despite their similarities, ginger and turmeric each have distinct flavors and color that make them easy to distinguish. Ginger has a warming sensation on the palate that’s sweet and citrusy, and the heat can be quite intense. Turmeric, on the other hand, has an earthy flavor with peppery heat. On the inside, ginger has yellow, fibrous flesh. Turmeric is deep orange just beneath it’s papery, brown skin with a similar texture to ginger.

Has your ginger taken a smelly turn? It’s easy to get bad smells from ginger out of your house with a few simple steps. First, discard any spoiled ginger. Then, clean the area where it was stored with hot, soapy water or home cleaning spray. Let it dry thoroughly.

To prevent bad smells from fruit in your kitchen and home, keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda in your fridge and anywhere you store food to prevent unpleasant aromas before they start.

See our section on how to store ginger  for help on keeping them fresher for longer!

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy ginger, we’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality, fresh ginger. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping ginger harvests, join our email newsletter!

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