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Jujube FAQs

It’s not the movie theatre candy you may have eaten by the boxful as a kid! Jujubes, pronounced “joo-joobs” when plural and “joo-joob” in the singular form, is fruit experience you won’t want to miss.

Fresh jujubes fruit and skin is edible, with an inedible stone in the center. Unripened, jujubes’ skin is taut and green, and the fruit inside is somewhat chalky without much flavor. As they mature, the skin turns red and the flesh begins to sweeten. Imagine a dry apple, and that gives you a sense of the jujube fruit texture at this stage of ripeness. As jujubes turn maroon on the outside, inside the fruit becomes nougat-like and spongy. This is what jujube fans around the world live for! With their fluffy texture and apple-meets-date flavor, fresh jujubes are a true fruit experience!

Jujubes, also known as the Chinese date, red date, or ziziphus jujuba if you love botany, taste a lot like apples. They’re also a little bit tart and a musky sweetness that’s date-like without the carmely overtones. Their flavor is magical in the way it changes as the jujubes ripen. Longtime jujube fans know they’re at their most delicious when fully ripened and wrinkly!

 

Loved by people for thousands of years, jujubes add sweet, musky deliciousness to countless recipes. Some of the most common ways to eat fresh jujube fruits are raw as a snack, dried, cooked into candies and jams, baked into cakes and pies, and stewed into flavorful syrups, roasted with meats and vegetables, in soups and added to sauces. The sweet and apple-like flavor of jujube is delicious in drinks of all kinds. Jujubes can be brewed into tea and enjoyed in juices and used in cocktails.

Because this fruit has been cultivated by humans for so long, botanists are still learning where jujubes originated. Varieties of jujube are believed to grow natively throughout China, and in areas of India and Lebanon. It’s known to be a hardy plant, so jujubes are successfully cultivated around the world today.

Jujubes are stone fruits that grow on a deciduous tree. The bushy Ziziphus jujuba tree can grow to nearly forty feet high, with green, pointy, oval leaves that are about three inches long. The branches from which the jujube fruit grow have protective thorns.

Fresh, unripened jujubes have taught, green skin that turns red, then darkens to maroon and even a purplish color when overripe (yet still tasty!). Inside, the flesh is whitish, and turns a bit more creamy-yellow as it ripens.

You’ll know a fresh jujube is ripe when the skin is completely maroon-red, with a slightly dimpled and wrinkly texture on the outside. Fresh, unripened jujubes have taught, green skin that turns to red, then maroon and slightly wrinkly when fully ripe.

The unique taste of jujube, whether fresh or dried, pairs well with all kinds of foods and is enjoyed by fruit fans of all ages, in both sweet and savory dishes. Jujube fruits have been bringing deliciousness to humans for thousands of years, so there are countless ways to prepare them. These fruits can be preserved, fermented, used fresh, and as an ingredient.

No. Jujubes are stone fruits, so they have a hard, inedible pit in the center. Don’t worry, the pit is easily removed by breaking apart the fruit and simply removing it with your fingers. These pits could be harmful if chewed or chopped and swallowed, so remove them before serving fresh jujubes to young children.

Because this fruit has been cultivated by humans for so long, botanists are still learning where jujubes originated. Varieties of jujube are believed to grow natively throughout China, and in areas of India and Lebanon. It’s known to be a hardy plant, so jujubes are successfully cultivated around the world today.

Jujubes are stone fruits that grow on a deciduous tree. The bushy Ziziphus jujuba tree can grow to nearly forty feet high, with green, pointy, oval leaves that are about three inches long. The branches from which the jujube fruit grow have protective thorns.

Jujubes are one fab fruit that’s (almost) as nutritious as it is delicious!  

Jujube Nutrition (100g)

  • Calories: 79
  • Protein: 1g
  • Carbohydrates: 20g
  • Fiber: 10g
  • Calcium: 21 mg
  • Magnesium: 10mg
  • Potassium: 250mg
  • Sodium: 3mg
  • Vitamin C: 69mg

Learn more about jujube nutrition on the USDA website.

In the United States, jujube season peaks in October, lasting from the end of September through the end of November.

Loved by people for thousands of years, jujubes add sweet, musky deliciousness to countless recipes. Some of the most common ways to eat fresh jujube fruits are raw as a snack, dried, cooked into candies and jams, baked into cakes and pies, and stewed into flavorful syrups, roasted with meats and vegetables, in soups and added to sauces. The sweet and apple-like flavor of jujube is delicious in drinks of all kinds. Jujubes can be brewed into tea and enjoyed in juices and used in cocktails.

The unique taste of jujube, whether fresh or dried, tends to pair well with all kinds of foods and fruit fans of all ages. It’s particularly enjoyable with certain cheeses, chocolate, paired with other stone fruits like coconut or plums, or orange citrus fruits and warm spices like cinnamon.

Overall, jujubes taste a lot like apples, with a bit of tartness and a musky sweetness that’s date-like without the carmely overtones.

Jujubes are magical in the way their flavor and texture changes as they ripen, and jujube pros know they’re at their most delicious when fully ripened and wrinkly! Unripened, jujubes’ skin is taut and green, and the fruit inside is somewhat chalky without much flavor. As they mature, the skin turns red and the flesh begins to sweeten. Imagine a dry apple, and that gives you a sense of the jujube fruit texture at this stage of ripeness. As jujubes turn maroon on the outside, inside the fruit becomes nougat-like and spongy. This is what jujube fans around the world live for! Date-like, slightly tart and somewhat fluffy, fresh jujubes are a true fruit experience!

The unique flavor of jujube, whether fresh or dried, tends to pair well with all kinds of foods and fruit fans of all ages. It’s particularly enjoyable with certain cheeses, ginger, chocolate, paired with other stone fruits like coconut or plums, or orange citrus fruits, and warm spices like cinnamon.

Fresh jujube fruits aren’t as popular in the US as they are in Asia, where they’re ubiquitous, delicious and loved by many.

Some of the most common ways to eat fresh jujube fruits are raw as a snack, dried, cooked into candies and jams, baked into cakes and pies, stewed into flavorful syrups, roasted with meats and vegetables, in soups and added to sauces.  

Often confused for a medjool date jujubes can be used as a substitute in recipes that call for dates.

The sweet and apple-like flavor of jujube is delicious in drinks of all kinds. Jujubes can be brewed into tea and enjoyed in juices and used in cocktails.

As they ripen, jujube fruits can be left on the countertop for up to a week. Keeping jujubes in an airtight container can keep them fresher for a few days longer. In a sealed container in the refrigerator, jujube fruits can stay fresh for up to two weeks.

To freeze jujubes, wait until they are fully ripened. Freeze jujube fruits whole or sliced in halves with pits removed, on a cookie sheet with space between each piece. Once frozen, store the fruit in an airtight container in the freezer for up to a year.

Once dried or cooked into recipes like tea and candies, the shelf life will vary. Dried jujubes can stay fresh, when stored in an airtight container in a cool, dark place, for over a year. If you live in a warmer or more humid climate, you may find better storage success by keeping your fresh or dry jujubes in the fridge.

Yes! Fresh jujube flesh is ok for your favorite pooches in small quantities. Do not give whole jujubes to pets because the hard pit inside can be toxic and may cause gastrointestinal issues or painful blockages. Your FruitStand fam encourages you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch.

Even though the fruit is lightly colored inside and not too messy, if jujube comes in contact with certain fabrics it can leave a brownish stain. Fruit Geek 101: Keep a portable stain stick on hand for impromptu fruit feasts. Quickly treating a fruit juice spot greatly increases your chances of avoiding a stain.

In life, a little fruit must fall. If you drop a bit of jujube on your clothing, table cloth or napkins, first treat the spot with a stain remover that’s safe for that particular fabric. Follow the directions on the product to prevent the spot from setting, and pop the item into the washer as soon as you can.

Because sweet little jujubes are so popular in their dried form, they’re often compared to another oft-dried fruit and fellow stone fruit: the date. Even though jujubes are sometimes called red dates, they’re different fruits, distinctive in their flavor, color and flesh. That said, some recipes can easily substitute in jujubes, either fresh or dried, where dates may be called for. Nutritionally their content is similar, however jujubes are known to contain higher values of certain vitamins and minerals like vitamin C.

In flavor, jujubes taste a lot like apples, with a bit of tartness and a musky sweetness that’s date-like without the carmely overtones. Jujube texture is also dry and sponge like, whereas dates have a more rich and sticky flesh.

If jujube spoils, you may smell something a little funky. First, discard any spoiled fruit and clean the area where it was stored with hot, soapy water or home cleaning spray. Keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda in your fridge and anywhere you store food every two to three months to prevent unpleasant aromas before they start.

If you’ve ever wondered where to buy jujube, we’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality jujube. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping jujube harvests, join our email newsletter!

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