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Oroblanco FAQs

Nick Musica
Published Jan 27, 2021. Read time: 1 minute

The oroblanco is a citrus fruit that’s a hybrid between two varieties of pummelo and grapefruit, Citrus grandis Osbeck × C. Paradisi Macf. Also called oro blanco (white gold), the oroblanco grapefruit, sweeties and pomelit, we think this impeccable fruit has been slept on for far too long. If you love citrus yet aren’t usually a fan of grapefruit, oroblanco might just be the perfect fruit experience for you!

On the outside, oroblanco’s zesty citrus peel is a soft lime green color. The green peel changes to an almost pastel yellow in the days after harvesting, but isn’t a good indication of ripeness. After all, oroblanco grapefruits are usually ripe at harvesting. Inside, the lemon yellow sections of fruit rest inside a very thick, marshmallowy soft white pith.

If you’re holding an oroblanco, it’s ripe enough to eat! Don’t be confused by their greenish hue. A green blush remains as the fruit’s color changes into a soft yellow over time. Inside, the fruit will be sweet, soft and ready to eat!

Oroblanco grapefruits are a hybrid fruit native to California. It was created at the University of California in the middle of the 20th century. It grows on hardy trees similar to lemon, lime and grapefruit trees, with shiny leaves and relatively short overall tree height.Today, oroblanco grapefruits are cultivated in the United States in California and Florida, Australia, Israel, and Japan. Oroblanco fruits come into season in the fall and remain available through late winter.

On the outside, oroblanco grapefruit’s zesty citrus peel is a soft lime green color. The green peel changes to an almost pastel yellow in the days after harvesting, but is not an indication of ripeness since Oroblanco fruits are usually ripe at harvesting. Inside, the lemon yellow sections of fruit rest inside a very thick, soft white pith.

If you’re holding an oroblanco, it’s ripe enough to eat! Don’t be confused by their greenish hue. These fruits are typically harvested when ripe and even retain their green blush as the fruit’s color changes into a soft yellow over time. Inside, the fruit will be sweet, soft and ready to eat!

Oroblanco fruits can be prepared in raw and cooked recipes. The edible portions of the fruit include the zest and juicy citrus fruit inside. The thick, dense pith is not edible and should be discarded. Slice them in half and squeeze out the sweet, grapefruit like fruit for a refreshing juice, or bite into a slice of its yellow fruit. The oroblanco’s natural sweetness is highlighted whether cooked into savory dishes or desserts.

Oroblanco fruits are blissfully seedless, although it’s possible to come across one every now and again. If you do, spit it out the way you would a lemon or orange seed.

Oroblanco is a hybrid fruit native to California where it was created at the University of California in the middle of the 20th century. It grows on hardy trees that look similar to lemon, lime and grapefruit trees, with shiny leaves and relatively short overall tree height.Today, oroblanco grapefruits are cultivated in the United States in California and Florida, Australia, Israel, and Japan.

There isn’t a lot of reliable scientific data about the specific nutrition of oroblanco fruits. Some sources claim that they’re high in vitamin C and fiber, which is typical of many citrus fruits. Check with your doctor about whether the nutrition of oroblanco is appropriate for you and your family.

Oroblanco fruits come into season in the fall and remain available through late winter.

Like many citrus fruits, oroblanco is welcome in just about any recipe where sweet, sour citrus flavor is needed. Use it in desserts to brighten up creams, candies, cakes and pies. Grate zest or squeeze the juice into sauces, marinades and soups. Use oroblanco to impart mildly acidic sweetness to rich meat dishes or delicate seafood preparations. The culinary uses of oroblanco are only limited by your imagination.

Oroblanco is an incredibly fragrant citrus fruit that tastes like grapefruit that’s very sweet rather than bitter. In fact, oroblanco is a hybrid fruit that is the result of crossing a pummelo with a grapefruit. The oroblanco leaves behind all bitterness and acidity of grapefruit in favor of a bright, sweet citrus flavor. If you love citrus yet aren’t a fan of grapefruit, oroblanco might just be the perfect fruit experience for you!

As a citrus fruit, oroblanco offers many ways to enjoy its fragrant, sweet citrus fruit. Use the fruit and the zest in raw applications to brighten up sauces, seafood, salads, soups, desserts and more! Cook it into citrusy candies, jams, or even rich meats like pork and beef. Oroblanco is an incredibly versatile fruit that imparts intense grapefruit flavor without even a hint of bitterness.

The citrus family is responsible for making our favorite drinks even more delicious, and oroblanco is no exception. This relatively new fruit is a twist on a grapefruit in that it has all the flavor with none of the bitterness or acidity. The oroblanco adds sweet grapefruit flavor to just about any drink where a sour-sweet citrus twist is welcome. Add oroblanco to soft drinks and cocktails from enhanced water to teas, cocktails and fresh juices for a completely new fruit drinking experience!

Oroblanco fruit isn’t just delicious, it has an amazing shelf life too! Because oroblanco has an especially thick rind, the fruit inside is protected for longer. They can be left on the countertop for up to three weeks. Oroblanco may keep even longer if stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

There are two common ways to prepare oroblanco fruit for freezing. First, remove the peel and separate or cut the fruit into slices. Lay wax paper down on a cookie sheet and arrange the fruit with space between each piece. Once frozen, store the fruit in an airtight container in the freezer for up to a year. Another option is to squeeze the juice from the fruit and store in the freezer in an airtight container or ice cube tray.

Good pups love a sweet citrus snack every once in a while! Dogs can eat oroblanco fruit in small quantities, since this type of fruit can cause upset tummies in some dogs. Over at FruitStand, we love sharing fruit with our wet-nosed friends, so we encourage you to clear the safety of any new fruits or veggies with your veterinarian before offering them your pooch.

Even though oroblanco fruit is light in color, if it comes in contact with light colored fabrics it can leave a brownish stain. Fruit Geek 101: Keep a portable stain stick on hand for impromptu fruit feasts. Quickly treating a fruit juice spot greatly increases your chances of avoiding a stain.

Oroblanco has a light yellow color, but if its sweet fruit or juice drops onto clothing, table cloth or napkins, it can leave a mark. Immediately treat the spot with a stain remover that’s safe for that particular fabric. Follow the directions on the product to prevent the spot from setting, and pop the item into the washer as soon as you can.

Oroblanco and grapefruit are two citrus fruits with a lot in common. In fact, oroblanco is a hybrid fruit that is the result of crossing a pummelo with a grapefruit. The oroblanco retains the size, shape and juiciness of a ripe grapefruit, but leaves behind all bitterness and acidity in favor of a bright, sweet citrus flavor. If you love citrus yet aren’t a fan of grapefruit, oroblanco might just be the perfect fruit experience for you!

Grapefruits typically have pinkish orange flesh and peel, where an oroblanco ranges in color from yellowish white to yellow with blushes of green. Oroblanco’s peel is significantly thicker thanks to its pummelo heritage. Inside, oroblanco flesh is almost as yellow as lemon, with fresh grapefruit flavor minus any bitterness associated with the conventional fruit. Oroblanco also has the benefit of being seedless, whereas grapefruits often retain their seeds.

Has your once sweet-smelling oroblanco gone from pleasant to pungent? It’s easy to get bad smells from oroblanco out of your house with a few simple steps. First, discard any spoiled oroblanco. Then, clean the area where the fruit was stored with hot, soapy water or home cleaning spray. Let it dry thoroughly.

To prevent bad smells from fruit in your kitchen and home, keep an old-fashioned box of baking soda in your fridge and anywhere you store food every two to three months to prevent unpleasant aromas before they start.

See our FAQ on how to store oroblanco  for help on keeping them fresher for longer!

Wondering where to buy oroblanco? We’ve got great news for you! FruitStand is proud to partner with small, specialty farmers to bring you exceptional quality oroblanco. To be the first to know when FruitStand is shipping oroblanco harvests, join our email newsletter!

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